How to Use Organizational Checkups to Achieve Consistent Growth in Your Dental Practice

Giving your dental practice an organizational checkup is important for many reasons. Among them, it helps you ensure everyone is working together toward your common goal. It also helps make sure every team member is performing their tasks consistently well.

Organizational checkups are so important that we ask all our Inner Circle Mastermind members to conduct them on a regular basis. We also include organizational checkup training in the leadership track of Dental Profit Academy.

Here’s how to use organizational checkups to achieve consistent growth in your practice.

1. Get a baseline score by conducting your first organizational checkup.

 

How to Use Organizational Checkups to Achieve Consistent Growth in Your Dental Practice

 

We teach dentists to conduct organizational checkups by ranking 20 qualities of their practices on a scale of one through five, with a score of five being the best.

For example, one quality we ask them to rank is whether their core business is clear and their systems and processes reflect that. If a practice has a clear core business with systems and processes that reflect it, their score would likely be a five. But if they have neither a clear core business nor systems or processes in place, their score would likely be a one. Or if they have some but not all of those things in place, they might score a two, three, or four.

Each of those scores is your baseline for the quality measured, such as a score of three on whether your core business is clear and you have systems and processes to reflect it.

At the end, you add up all of your scores to get your total baseline score. With twenty questions, the highest score you can achieve is 100, the lowest you can achieve is a 20. A score of 100 is not realistic if we’re being honest with ourselves. A score of 20 is also not realistic if we’re being honest with ourselves. We can be our own worst critics and not give ourselves the credit we deserve. Almost any practice has at least one or two things they are doing well. It might not feel that way sometimes because of how stressful things can be.

At my Inner Circle Mastermind event in New Orleans, we asked volunteers to share their organizational checkup scores. Four people volunteered their scores of 64, 47, 55, and 28. Obviously, the practice that scored a 28 was just getting started focusing on building the practice of their dreams. The other practices had all been working toward building the right direction, structure, and team longer.

While it can be painful to conduct your first organizational checkup, both your total score and each individual quality score provide a helpful baseline you can use to evaluate progress over time.

2. Identify action steps.

 

How to Use Organizational Checkups to Achieve Consistent Growth in Your Dental Practice

 

Once you have your baseline score, take a look at each of the components. When you do, you’ll likely see qualities that fall into a few categories.

First, you’ll find qualities where you scored a perfect five. Those generally need the least amount of attention moving forward because you’re already doing well in those areas. Action steps for these areas focus more on refining and continuous improvement than overhauling.

Second, you’ll find qualities in the three and four range. You’re doing well with those, but they could use a few tweaks. They might be your easier fixes, so identify the steps you can take to get these from a three or four to a five. These are the easier improvements to make, so look for those easy improvements.

Third, you’ll find qualities in the one and two range. These are areas that need more work and attention. If the reason you’re struggling in these areas is because you haven’t paid attention to them, these are areas where attention and planning will help. If you’re struggling because you need help, don’t have experience or knowledge in the area, or don’t like it, consider getting outside help. Consider hiring a coach or consultant to help you, like I did when I was transforming my practice. You could also get specific training through something like Dental Profit Academy. Or, you could join a dental leader mastermind like my Inner Circle Mastermind.

3. Take action, measure again, and adjust.

 

How to Use Organizational Checkups to Achieve Consistent Growth in Your Dental Practice

 

A list of action steps is helpful. But a list alone won’t improve results. Only taking action improves results. Once you have your list of action steps, start taking action. Get help from key team members so you don’t have to do everything yourself.

If you need more help or insights than they can provide, get outside help. Otherwise, you’ll end up with more of the same for your practice—and for your personal life.

Thirty days later, conduct another organizational checkup to see the progress you’ve made and identify areas for additional improvement. When you’re just getting started, monthly checkups are a good idea. They only take a few minutes, and your action steps will be fewer and fewer. Over time, you could do them less frequently; however, we still suggest doing them regularly.

Is it time for an organizational checkup for your dental practice?

If you haven’t given your practice a checkup in a while, take a few minutes to rank each part of your practice on a scale of one to five. Measure your systems, team unity, practice vision, systems and processes, accountability structure, organizational goals, and more. Then take action and assess again thirty days later to measure the first month of continuous growth for your practice.

If you haven’t given your practice a checkup, it’s time to get started on a path to continuous growth. If you want help, visit our Leadership Track inside Dental Profit Academy. There you’ll find the exact training we give our Inner Circle Mastermind members, including a lesson on organizational checkups.

You can also join my free Dental Marketing and Profits Facebook group, where thousands of dentists and I help each other build better practices.