How to Run a Productive Team Meeting

How to Run a Productive Team Meeting

Holding productive team meetings is one of the best ways to make sure your most important practice tasks get done. For some larger practices, that means meeting regularly with your leadership team. Smaller practices might include every team member. Either way, the key to success is to run your meetings well.

We suggest holding meetings on a regular schedule, preferably weekly but no less frequently than every other week. Weekly works best because it puts you in better control of your practice results. They ensure you do not wait two weeks to learn about and address issues. Also, if you are traveling and your team needs to run a meeting without you, you will not go a month without attending a meeting.

Regular weekly meetings create a productive rhythm for your practice. Here is our seven-step plan for getting the most out of team meetings.

1. Opening Exercise (5 minutes)

 

How to Run a Productive Team Meeting

 

Appoint a team leader to run your meetings. Make sure they start and end every meeting on time. Starting on time sets a standard of timeliness that extends beyond the meeting. Ending on time makes everyone focus during the meeting and avoids having them drag on.

 

Make sure someone takes notes at each meeting. Important items will be discussed and having to remember it all is impossible, especially with so much on our plates. Keep those notes in one place, such as a single notebook or shared Google Doc.

As the meeting opens, the meeting leader should ask for a volunteer to share one personal achievement and one professional achievement from the last week.

Personal achievements could include that someone ran a 5k and are really proud. A professional achievement could be that someone asked ten patients for reviews that earned six five-star reviews for the practice.

This is not a time for discussion, just announcements, but it is an important part of team building. Move around the room until everyone has shared a personal and professional achievement.

2. Scorecard Review (5 minutes)

Take five minutes to review and fill out your practice scorecard. Ask each team member to let you know if their scorecard items are on or off track.

If it is on track, great. Anything off track should be moved to the IDS portion of the meeting, where you will identify, discuss, and solve practice issues.

3. Rock Review (5 minutes)

In addition to practice goals, each team member should have their own rocks—or goals—to pursue. Take five minutes to review practice and individual rocks and find out what is on track and off track.

For example, one of the doctor’s rocks might be to create a dental savings plan. One of your team leaders’ rocks might be to get cancellations and no shows below 10%. Another could be to create a coffee table culture book for the practice.

Asking each team member about their rocks during your meeting helps build a culture of accountability and support among team members. If something is off track, put it on the agenda for the IDS part of the meeting, during which you all identify, discuss, and solve issues.

4. Customer and Employee Headlines (5 Minutes)

 

How to Run a Productive Team Meeting

 

After each team member updates you on their rocks, take five minutes to discuss updates about patients or employees. These can be positive or negative, such as good Facebook or Google reviews or disgruntled patients. This is also a good time for team members to give kudos to colleagues who have gone above and beyond.

If something negative can be resolved quickly, do so. If it needs more discussion, add it to the IDS portion of the meeting.

5. Previous To-Do List Review (5 Minutes)

Take five minutes to discuss the status of to-do items from last meeting’s IDS session. Ask each team member whether they have completed their to-do items.

If so, check it off as complete. If they are on target, keep it in the to-do list for next week. If they are off target, move it to the IDS discussion for this week.

6. IDS (Identify, Discuss, Solve) (30–60 minutes)

This will take the majority of the meeting time. Ask each team member to take thirty to sixty seconds to write down the three most important issues they are facing.

When they are finished, have one team member identify their issues. Once the issue is identified, take a few minutes to discuss possible solutions. After a couple of minutes, choose a solution with which to move forward. Then put the tasks on a to-do list for your next meeting, and assign the tasks to the appropriate team member.

Go around the room until you identify, discuss, and solve each team member’s top three issues.

At some point during your IDS session, you the meeting will start to wind down. Give a ten-minute warning to ensure the meeting will end on time. Do the same with five minutes left, at which point the meeting will begin to conclude.

7. Review and Conclusion

 

How to Run a Productive Team Meeting

 

Once you have completed your IDS session, recap your to-do checklist so everyone knows what they need to do. Read them out loud and make eye contact with the team member responsible for doing the task. Designate someone to deliver messages to people who could not make the meeting.

Finally, ask each team member to rate your meeting on a scale of one to ten, with ten being the best. If someone rates it less than an eight, ask them to tell the group why so you can improve.

Are you ready to boost productivity in your practice?

If you want to make your practice more productive, high-impact productivity meetings might be the answer. Follow these seven steps, and you will be well on your way to a more productive office.

To learn more about boosting productivity in your practice, check out the team of expert coaches, training, and resources we offer in our signature Delivering WOW Platinum Mastermind Program.

And if you want to go beyond productive team meetings to a practice that’s as effective, repeatable systems designed to help you grow your production month over month, then our upcoming Marketing & Practice Growth Challenge is for you.

How to Build an Environment in Which Every Team Member Does Their Best Work

How to Build an Environment in Which Every Team Member Does Their Best Work

My Delivering WOW team members are some of the most trustworthy, knowledgeable, and motivated people I have ever met. They know marketing, dental practice management, and effective ways to help practice leaders grow.

They are successful with Delivering WOW and active in the dental industry. For example, one team member works at a multi-location dental practice. During her first year, she grew the hygiene department 104%. In the last 18 months, she added millions of dollars to the organization through hygiene production alone. She also decreased cancellations and no-shows from 30% to less than 10%. The list goes on.

Her success with Delivering WOW and in her current position suggests she turns everything she touches into gold. While it is true that she is talented and hardworking enough to do so, she would be the first to tell you her career wasn’t without its challenges.

As leaders, we can help team members fly or clip their wings and hold them down.

 

How to Build an Environment in Which Every Team Member Does Their Best Work

 

Earlier in her career, this amazing team member moved across the country to take a job. When she started, she was told not to say or do anything for the first ninety days. Her bosses told her to be a “fly on the wall” and just observe operations during that time.

Twelve days into her job, however, she was called into the president’s office and fired. She was told that management didn’t think the position was right for her. They complained that she hadn’t made any decisions to help the company during the first twelve days. She had moved across the country and her husband had quit a job he held for a decade to move with her.

After defending herself as having followed directions, she was given one more chance. Needless to say, she completely lost trust in the leadership team. They told her to be a fly on the wall and then tried to fire her for doing so twelve days later. After taking a break to compose herself, she told one of the leaders how disappointed she was. She then decided to go back to the office do her best work, although it was hard to trust leadership after that. Eventually, she left and found new employment where she felt better supported and did incredible work from the start.

While she was able to turn a negative situation into a positive, not every team member is as self-motivated and determined as she is. She only stayed there long enough to be noticed and recruited by her next employer.

Build a positive environment to get the best work out of every team member.

 

How to Build an Environment in Which Every Team Member Does Their Best Work

 

What did her new employer do differently to get her best work? Why did her earlier employer tell her to be a fly on the wall and then fire her twelve days in? Simple. The difference between the two companies is the environment the leadership team built.

The environment at her old employer caused her to feel fearful. She would sit and question her emails multiple times before sending them out. She wouldn’t take risks or reach beyond the direct responsibilities of her position. She would not take any risk. She was miserable.

The environment at her new employer gave her the freedom to take risks and make decisions she felt were best for the company. She did not have the same fear of being fired for minor offenses.

How to build a positive environment that gets the best work out of every team member.

 

How to Build an Environment in Which Every Team Member Does Their Best Work

 

Leadership expert Simon Sinek talks frequently about the impact of environments on productivity. In short, Sinek says if people trust leadership and feel safe and supported, they will do their best work. If not, they will do just enough to not get fired before they can find another job.

Building an environment that gets the best work out of your team is much simpler than many dentists expect. Generally, you only need two things to build a supportive environment.

First, you need consistency in what you measure and the metrics that matter. Let your team know what is most important, and systematize as much of your day-to-day operations as you can. By doing so, each team member will know what they need to do to succeed and will have simple strategies for completing the most common ones. That frees them up to direct their creativity toward helping you build your practice.

Second, you need to manage people. You need to lead people well. With systems in place and clear metrics being measured, your team will understand the goals for their position. But team members work harder for leaders they trust. If you tell them to be a fly on the wall for the first ninety days, do not threaten their jobs twelve days later for not doing more. That is a surefire way to lose trust. Your team will do just enough to not get in trouble.

If you are consistent and trustworthy and show people small failures won’t make them lose their job, they will do whatever they can to help you achieve your practice vision.

Continued improvement in systems and measurements plus your ability to lead people will create an environment in which every team member feels empowered and does their best work.

Are you building a supportive environment in your practice?

The only way to get the best work from every team member is to build an environment built on trust and support. As practice leaders, we all must continue to develop our leadership skills in addition to implanting systems and processes to support our operations.

For more help get started on becoming the best practice leader you can be, join our upcoming Marketing & Practice Growth Challenge — save 20% off with the code CHALLENGE at checkout!

How to Create Teams and Assign Projects to Team Members Using Asana

How to Create Teams and Assign Projects to Team Members Using Asana

Asana is one of my favorite tools to increase productivity in dental practices. It is the best way to collaborate with team members to manage key tasks and projects. You can easily get everyone on the same page and prevent key tasks from falling behind or not happening at all.

Asana keeps everything organized and sends automated email notifications to team members when they have something to do or a task they are working on gets updated. You can also send notifications to team members manually through Asana by tagging them in a post just like you would tag someone on social media.

If you have never used Asana before, you are only four steps away from the peace of mind that comes with knowing your most important tasks are organized, assigned, and on track.

1. Sign up for Asana to manage dental practice projects with ease.

 

How to Create Teams and Assign Projects to Team Members Using Asana

 

If you have never used Asana, you can sign up at Asana.com. Asana is a web-based program so you can access the secure platform from anywhere you have an internet connection. No need to stay late at the office to review progress and keep tasks on target anymore.

Asana offers a free version for small teams that do not need customized privacy settings. The free version lets you either keep information private to you or make it public to everyone on your team. For customized privacy settings, which I recommend, claim a free trial to the premium version. Customized settings allow you to choose exactly who has access to what information, instead of limiting it to nobody or everybody. When your trial expires, you pay a small fee per user. If you use Asana well, increased productivity will more than cover the fee.

2. Create teams for your practice.

The best way to manage projects is to make sure everyone knows exactly what they need to do and by when they need to do it. Asana’s “team” function allows you to do just that. Once you set up your account, you can set different Asana teams for different needs and assign team members only to the teams they need to access.

We suggest starting with five teams. First, create a team for your entire practice. There, you can share practice-wide initiatives, news, and information. Second, create one for training where you manage training activities within your practice. Third, create a team for accounting and finance. There your accounting and finance teams can manage information. Finally, set up a team for marketing where you can keep all your marketing materials and activities organized.

When you set up a team, choose a name, add a description, and then add email addresses for team members who need access. You can choose for the team to be hidden or public to the entire practice. Projects and tasks in a hidden team will only be visible to members of that team. Projects and tasks in a public team will be visible to all practice team members.

3. Create team projects.

 

How to Create Teams and Assign Projects to Team Members Using Asana

 

Once you create your teams, start creating projects for each team. As with teams, you can edit privacy settings for projects to be public or private only to select team members.

We recommend adding projects for the items you want to make sure happen in your practice. For example, you could set a project for your Team Leader Live Agenda, Training, 90-Day Planning, and Systems for your practice-wide team.

Having a Team Leader Live Agenda projects allows you to make sure your agenda is up to date. It also ensures your entire team knows what topics their team leaders are focusing on. Your Training project lets everyone know what training they must complete. The 90-Day Planning makes sure you set your 90-day goals and stay on track with tasks needed to achieve them. Finally, a Systems project organizes key practice systems in one place.

4. Create sections and assign tasks to the right team members.

Within projects you can create multiple “sections.” Sections function as additional ways to organize tasks by timeline or priority. For example, in your 90-day planning project, you could have three sections, one for each month.

Once you set any sections you need, you can easily create and assign specific tasks to team members. Each task is organized in one convenient thread where you can add a description, attach documents, assign a due date, communicate with team members, and even assign the task back and forth. All of your communications will be in one place, so you never have to waste time searching email or papers again. When a team member completes his or her part of a task, they can “assign” it back to you for review similar to volleyball players knocking the ball back and forth over the net. If you need them to adjust their work on a task, you can add a comment and assign it back. If it is complete, you can mark it as complete or assign it to another team member to add their part.

Are you ready to get more organized and productive than ever before?

 

How to Create Teams and Assign Projects to Team Members Using Asana

 

Asana is my favorite productivity tool for your practice. Once it is set up, creating and assigning tasks will be easier than ever. You can keep all tasks organized and on track from wherever you have an internet connection.

To learn more about using Asana to get more organized and productive than ever before, check out the team of expert coaches, training, and resources we offer in our signature Delivering WOW Platinum Mastermind Program.

If you want to join hundreds of practices that we've been helping on getting more productive and organized, please check out our upcoming Marketing & Practice Growth Challenge.

Find out more here — plus use the code CHALLENGE at checkout to get 20% off!

How To Attract Your Ideal New Patient With Cyndi Blalock

Cyndi Blalock - Delivering Wow Podcast Ep 84

This week on the Delivering Wow podcast I had the pleasure of talking to Dr. Cyndi Blalock. Dr. Blalock passionately believes in ‘finding your tribe’. By finding your ideal patients and team, you can create the practice of your dreams.

Cyndi Blalock - Delivering Wow Podcast

Dr. Blalock completed her Bachelor of Science degree at Southeast Missouri State University in Cape Girardeau, MO and completed her Doctor of Dental Surgery training at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry. During her training she completed an externship in oral and maxillofacial surgery at Truman Medical Center.

Dr. Blalock is an active member of the American Dental Association, as well as the Missouri Dental Association and Greater St. Louis Dental Society. She has spent time at the Missouri Capitol educating Missouri state representatives and senators about issues effecting the field of dentistry. She also writes a column that appears in The Arch magazine and is proud to provide dental care to the service men and women in the Army, Navy, and the Missouri National Guard.

On the podcast we discussed:

  • The journey that led her to where she is today
  • What ‘find your tribe’ means and why she follows that philosophy
  • Why you should define the kind of patients that you want to serve and then ensure that you focus on finding them
  • Having team members who are onboard with your philosophy
  • The process that Dr. Blalock and her team follow to define their tribe
  • What to do if you have patients that you would rather not have
  • How to find your ideal patient – from asking for referrals to using social media
  • How powerful Facebook advertising can be when trying to define and find your ideal patient
  • The culture of Dr. Blalock’s dental practice and importance of leading by example

Cyndi Blalock - Delivering Wow Podcast

You can find Cyndi on Facebook

If you haven’t done so already, please do make sure that you join the Dental Marketing and Profits Facebook Group

Here's a short video trailer of the podcast episode:

 

How to Keep Your Team Members Motivated

When building a Delivering WOW dental practice, you'll quickly discover that one of your best investments of time and money is in your team.

Although building a better team starts with committing to making sure every team member is aligned with your practice vision, investing in continued training and inspiring them to perform their best, you must invest in keeping your team members motivated if you want consistent and steady growth for your practice.

With a team of motivated and loyal team members in place, you'll be able to delegate more and work less, without sacrificing profits.

With disloyal or unmotivated team members, your patient care will be inconsistent at best. Here are three ways to create a WOW work experience for your team members so you can keep your team motivated and performing their best.

1. Make working for your practice about more than the money.

Make sure working for your practice isn't just about collecting a paycheck. A paycheck might bring them back to work the next day, but it won't keep them motivated to do their best work.

Although this starts with recruiting the right people into your practice, it can't stop there. Team members who see their work connected to things like giving back to your community and participating in charitable initiatives, it gives them regular reminders that their work is connected to a bigger purpose.

2. Support and showcase your team members in public.

Look for opportunities to support and showcase your team members in public. Even small gestures like sharing, retweeting, liking, or commenting on their social posts will build their connection to your practice. Other things you can do is share praise for them online or donate to causes or fundraisers they're involved with. You can also allow them to lead a charitable initiative for your practice. These small gestures remind them they're important to you and keep them motivated to do their best because they'll know that they'll be publicly praised and privately appreciated.

3. Give your team members unique perks.

According to John Ruhlin, author of Giftology: The Art and Science of Using Gifts to Cut Through the Noise, Increase Referrals, and Strengthen Retention, one of the best ways to build a motivated and loyal team is to give them unique perks. The best perks to give, according to Ruhlin, are “practical luxuries,” which are benefits that make their lives easier or more enjoyable. For example, Ruhlin budgets $1,500 per employee per year to have their houses cleaned.

Look for ways to invest in practical luxuries for your team members, too. In my practice, I give my team members Amazon Kindle ebook readers and give them books for their personal and professional enjoyment. Be creative. Listen for things they struggle with in their day-to-day lives and look for ways to create a perk to make their lives more enjoyable. How can you make your team members’ lives easier or more enjoyable?

Show me your team and I’ll show you your future.

A well-known quote says if you “show me your friends . . . I'll show you your future.” In business, the same things holds true, only the friends who control your future are your team members.

If your team members are loyal and motivated, your future will be bright. You'll make more, work less, and enjoy your life. If not, you'll struggle and eventually burn out.

Show your team members you care about them. Take an interest in what they do. Make working for your practice about more than just a paycheck. And look for opportunities to give them practical luxuries.

That care and generosity will be reciprocated and everyone will benefit—your team members, your patients, your family, and you.

If you want more ideas for how to motivate your team members, you can still get a 14-day trial membership to Delivering Wow U right here. You could also get ideas from me and over 2,000 other dentists in the Delivering WOW Facebook Dental Hangout on Facebook right here.

2 Ways to Inspire Your Dental Practice Team Members

As we’ve discussed before, building your team holds a special place of significance in your practice. Having the right team in place helps you make more money in less time because it allows you to delegate administrative tasks to others and focus your time on building your business and enjoying what’s important to you outside of your practice.

When we last talked about how to build the right team to transform your dental practice, we walked through finding and testing candidates to make sure they fit the vision and culture of the practice you’re building. This included things like identifying qualities you need in each team member, such as a strong work ethic or good attitude, and incorporating your practice vision and culture into your candidate search.

By evaluating team members and candidates to ensure they share your vision for your practice, embrace the culture of your practice, and have the personal and professional qualities you need, you’ll help ensure you have the right people working with you.

Once they’re on board, however, it’s critical that you keep them inspired and motivated to do their best work on a consistent basis.

Even the most positive, hardworking team members can grow frustrated and uninspired over time. Because of that, it’s important to be intentional about designing your practice so it helps keep your team members inspired and working hard.

Here are two things you can do to help inspire them so you can be confident they’ll help you deliver a WOW experience to each and every patient, turn those patients to raving fans, and allow you to build a practice that helps you achieve your personal and professional goals.

1. Create clear systems and processes.

Some people are surprised that having systems and processes in place actually helps inspire team members. They think having more rules reduces satisfaction. That couldn’t be further from the truth. It’s not that the systems and processes inspire. It’s what having those systems and processes does that inspires and motivates your team members.

Without clear systems and processes in place, you’d have to do everything yourself to be confident it would be done consistently well or train people over and over again to do things that need to be done in your practice. That would be frustrating for everyone.

On the other hand, when you have clear systems and processes in place, you can train people once or twice on following the systems and processes, and then you can be confident they can perform those tasks instead of having to do them yourself.

Clear and documented systems and processes let your team members know exactly what’s expected of them. This sets them up for success and ensures they can do their job consistently well. That’s what helps keep them inspired and motivated. (It also reduces frustration on your part because things will be done right the first time and every time.)

2. Make sure your practice is about more than just teeth.

If your team members share your vision and get involved with community or charitable initiatives, it changes how they view their work. They’ll see an impact beyond the dental care and when people ask them what they do, they’ll connect their work to that greater impact.

When people ask how they like their job, they’ll light up and talk about all the great things your practice does beyond the teeth.

To promote this, regularly give back to the community through things like charity drives, donated or low-cost services, and more. Get your team on board. Reward them for participating. Have fun with it by recognizing their contributions on social media. Let them know that their great work allows your practice to make an even bigger impact.

Connect their work to a bigger story they can be proud of. In my practice, openly acknowledging how much my great and Spanish-speaking team member Mayra’s connection to the Spanish-speaking community helped us serve Medicaid patients who weren’t being served like the greater population helped keep Mayra inspired and motivated because she knew she was making an important impact. It also inspired other team members who helped serve those same patients.

What will you do to inspire your patients?

The key to personal and professional freedom lies in your ability to build a practice that can run without you.

Without inspired and dedicated team members, it doesn’t matter how hard you work, you’ll never be able to keep up, and you’ll never build a practice that helps you build the personal and professional life of your dreams. You’ll be stuck in the office all day, every day because you’ll have to do everything, every time.

Take a few minutes to identify how you can create systems and processes to help your team members take some work off your hands and to make their work part of something much bigger than fixing teeth.

How to Build the Right Team to Transform Your Dental Practice

Although all six elements of building a dental practice that can run without you are important, building the right team holds a special place of significance.

Building the right team for your practice is much more about vision, culture, and qualities than it is about assembling a group of people with the technical skills to perform tasks. Skills can be taught. Vision, culture, and qualities, however, are often deep-seated personal traits that are tough to change.

The best way to build the best team for your practice, then, is to start with vision, culture, and qualities. From there, you can help your team succeed by putting them in the right positions for them to succeed while investing in their technical skill development so they can continue to grow.

With the right people on your team, you will protect your core values and culture, and your practice will run much more smoothly. That will allow you to delegate more, work less, and feel confident that every patient will get the same great service no matter who serves them.

With the wrong people on board, it doesn’t matter how great your vision is or how strong your systems are, results will be inconsistent at best. When that happens, you’ll either have to do everything yourself or go through the time-consuming and costly process of firing, hiring, and training people over and over again. That’s a recipe for burnout.

Here are five steps to get started assembling the right team for your dental practice.

1. Commit to making sure every team member is a good fit for your practice.

Although this might seem obvious, it’s important to recognize your commitment because even one team member with a bad attitude or poor work ethic can put a big strain on your practice.

2. Identify the qualities you need in your team members.

Take a few minutes to list the qualities everyone will need in order for your team to succeed.

To help you get started, the two most important qualities are “strong work ethic” and “good attitude.” Those are two non-negotiable qualities because they can help overcome almost any obstacle a practice will face. Avoid people who are just looking for a paycheck or who aren’t willing to do whatever it takes to achieve your practice’s vision and goals.

With those two qualities in hand, list other qualities that are important. These need to be specific to your vision and goals. Do you prefer people who live in the community you serve? Do you need people who have a history of volunteering to serve not-for-profits?

With these qualities in mind, you’re ready to transform your team.

4. Invest in and evaluate your current team members.

Assembling the right team for your practice starts with investing in current team members. This requires you to explain your vision, show them how they fit into it, and clearly communicate what is expected of them. Make sure they feel included, see the value of their role in the future of your practice, and understand how to succeed.

This also requires you to invest in your team’s development by helping them grow personally and professionally. Provide tools and resources. Consider providing Kindles to fast-track their learning. We did this at my practice and recommended books to reinforce the vision we were building toward. We then facilitated helpful discussions about the books. Three great team reads are The Compound Effect by Darren Hardy, Eat That Frog! by Brian Tracy, and What Got You Here Won’t Get You There by Marshall Goldsmith. If you’re new to Audible, you can even get a free audio copy of any of those books through my partnership at DeliveringWow.com/Audible.

When you invest in and evaluate your current team members, you’ll likely find most of them come alive with new energy and get excited about their role in building your vision. You may also find that some existing team members aren’t a good fit, even after sharing your vision and trying to invest in them. If you discover a team member isn’t willing to make the transition needed, I suggest helping them find a better fit. It’s important to be a strong leader and not let a team member’s resistance keep you from building the practice you know is best for you.

We had one woman who thought the transition we needed would be too much work. I understood and told her that this was the new direction we were going with the practice and I was okay if she didn’t want to be a part of it. She found another practice that was a better fit for her. I moved forward with an extremely motivated team.

5. Incorporate your vision, culture, and qualities needed in external searches.

Although including your vision, culture, and required qualities up front will reduce the number of applicants you will get, it will also help filter applicants who aren’t a good fit. This will save you time, money, and frustration.

When people contact your office in response to an ad or a team member referral, continue include your vision, culture, and qualities at every stage of the interview process.

Before scheduling an interview, either you or a trusted team member should ask them why they’re interested in working with you if they’re responding to an ad, or communicate your vision, culture, and qualities if they’re a referral from someone. Listen to their response to make sure they sound like a good candidate before inviting them for an interview.

During the interview, discuss your vision. Ask them to share their ideas about how a practice can achieve that vision. Ask them what it would mean to them to work at a place like that. Ask them what it would mean to the community to build a practice like that. Finally, ask them for examples from their past experiences that demonstrate the qualities you need.

By doing this, you’ll help ensure new team members know exactly what type of practice they’d be joining. You’ll also get valuable information about whether they’re a fit for your practice and not just someone with the necessary technical skills to perform the tasks needed of them.

Your vision, your culture, your team

By including your practice vision, culture, and team‑member qualities in team development, you’ll help ensure you have the right people in place to help you grow the practice of your dreams.

Once you’ve assembled the right team, you’ll be able to delegate more confidently and sleep soundly knowing your practice is in good hands.

Take a few minutes to start walking through these five steps for your team.

Make sure to join us on the inside of the Delivering WOW Hangout, the FREE Facebook Group of the Delivering WOW Community!

How to Build a Better Team with LIsa Spradley

Lisa Marie Spradley, FAADOM, is the Front Desk Lady. She has worked in the front office for 20 years and understands the struggle to put patient’s needs first while still taking care of the business of the front office.

As a coach and speaker, she trains teams to develop conversational skills that can lead to more production and increase in-office referrals. Lisa is a published author having written articles for industry publications such as Dentistry IQ, The Dental Geek, and AGD Impact. Her ebook “Press 3 to File a Claim,” is available for purchase online at www.press3tofile.com.

An active, lifetime member, and Fellow of the American Association of Dental Office Managers (AADOM), Lisa was honored to be named the 2014 AADOM Office Manager of the Year. Her years of experience as an office manager led her to create in office workshops that offer a common sense approach to help teams strengthen leadership and communications skills, and focus more on individuals.

In this episode we discuss:

-The benefits of investing in team training, and different ways that you can train your team

-Which systematic way team members should be answering the phone

-If someone were to call and ask, how much is a crown, how you should respond

-The role of the front desk in the overall customer experience

-The role of the front desk in creating the practice’s culture

-How to manage conversations with patients when you are out of network

Lisa Marie Spradley

Make sure to join us on the inside of the Delivering WOW Hangout, the free Facebook group of the Delivering WOW Community

How to Create a Profitable Hygiene Department with Debbie Seidel-Bittke RDH

Debbie Seidel-Bittke is the founder of Dental Practice Solutions and helps the dental practice uncover their true potential without working any harder. She is also a top leader in consulting according to DENTISTRY TODAY.

Debbie is also a former clinical assistant professor for the dental hygiene program at USC in Los Angeles and a former hygiene program director at a college in Portland, Oregon.

Dental Practice Solutions takes a holistic approach to creating sustainable profits in a patient-centered environment, by improving systems, services and inefficiencies in the dental hygiene department.

Is this episode, we discuss

  • The one simple system you can implement today to be more profitable
  • The importance of relationship building and communication
  •  Simple ways to increase the retention rate of the hygiene department
  • How to ensure that your patients keep coming back

Debbie also shares exactly what you can do when patients say they don't want treatment..

Links in the episode:

Dental Practice Solutions

What's next:

Download my FREE guide: “The Complete Checklist to Systematizing Your Practice”.

Join the Delivering WOW Hangout, my FREE Facebook Group!

How To Get the Best ROI From Your TEAM

For many dentists, labor costs are one of the biggest expenses incurred. However, it's interesting how many dentists don't work to turn their employees into a profitable return on investment. If the dentist is not a strong leader, who is committed to building a great team and setting a clear path to achieving the vision of the practice, profits are escaping every day.  To turn your team into an investment, you've got to be a great leader who can build a team that is committed to helping the practice grow, knows what to do, and performs.

Strong leaders have an ability to inspire others, to build other leaders. They are able to paint a picture of how big the possibilities are for reaching massive goals, and enlist their employees to help them exceed them. Strong leaders give clear directions of their expectations and ensure that their employees know what to do. They are not afraid to have uncomfortable conversations, or to speak up when an employee is not performing. They inspire action.

To be a better leader for your team, share your goals and your vision. Make sure that your team knows what they, as well as you, are working for. Make sure that they understand that through your practice, everyone can achieve their personal dreams. If the business is profitable, everyone wins. A profitable practice means that EVERYONE is doing something right. It means that you have an office culture that is different and unique. It means that you have great systems for consistency. It means that you have a great brand. This level of success can not be achieved with you alone. You need your team. A team which can overdeliver and wow.  

Some dentists know that there are people who are not a great culture fit for their practice, but they keep them. They are too afraid to speak up. As a result, their practice will never reach its maximum potential and other employees don't see them as strong leaders. 

That being said, once you have your dream team, invest in their success. Carve out time for weekly lunch and learn/ practice growth sessions, provide your team with kindles and purchase books for them for their personal development. Reward them with awesome team building activities off site, and reward them with bonuses from profits!

Team members need to know that they are there to perform specific tasks to help the business grow. They are not there to hang out for the day and collect a paycheck. They need to know that if you wanted to or were able to perform their tasks, you could keep their wage and do it yourself. However, for any business to grow, it must leverage employees to scale up and accomplish more. Dentists must ensure that their team has specific directions of which tasks they must perform, and they must be held accountable. Take the time to have your best team members create manuals for their positions so future new hires have checklists of all of what they must do. These manuals should include photos of setups for operatories and trays, links to training videos that they must watch in your practice management software, and scripts of how common questions should be answered.

What this team looks like is one which brainstorms on growth strategies. This team prevents waste and negotiates with suppliers to get the best cost. This team is an advocate for the practice and helps to bring in new patients while they are out in the community. This team, in turn, is not an expense, but an investment.  

Invest in being a better leader and in giving your team the tools to soar, and they will return massive dividends!

 

Dr. Anissa Holmes, a Global leader in Social Media Marketing, and owner of Jamaica Cosmetic Dental Services, helps dentists and small business owners receive massive growth through developing their culture, systems and brand.

Dr. Holmes, through her podcast, The Delivering WOW Dental Podcast and her book Delivering WOW- How Dentists Can Build a Fascinating Brand And Achieve More While Working Less, shares tips for designing a unique business culture to deliver a “Wow” experience every time, strategies to triple leads and new customers as well as strategies to build an amazing team.

 

How to get your TEAM to Over Deliver

It is very interesting that many business owners say that their team should be satisfied to just “have a job”, or that their motivation should come from within.  

While it is true that your team should be self-starters, you will see their productivity and commitment to grow your business multiply once they feel your appreciation.

Have FUN with your team!  Offices can do bowling, paint-on-canvas parties, surprise shopping sprees, zip-lining, or spa days. These encourage team-buildng, and allow the team and the business owner to bond and grow.  

Many business owners say that they use verbal encouragement. This is, in fact, more important than any monetary compensation that you could provide. Once your TEAM knows that you appreciate their efforts to help your business grow, they will be motivated to give even more. I often comment in front of my customers how I am so fortunate and thrilled to have an Amazing team. My team members say that they have never felt so appreciated!

I personally believe in offering a reasonable base salary, with the remaining compensation based on performance.  That way, the TEAM is vested in the company. They are willing, if needed, to work through lunch or stay late.  They do whatever it takes to please to customers.

Only once the business is profitable, then the team can be rewarded a bonus.  Many business owners give financial rewards without knowing their numbers, or if they are in a position to do so. We were fortunate to give a 1 month's salary mid year bonus.

My team has done vision boards, so they know ahead of time what their bonus will be allocated to. If there is no profit, there is no bonus.  We are all working to achieve our goals, and it just works!